Friday, May 27, 2016

One-time Proofing Soft Bread (Killer Toast)

Killer Toast
Killer Toast

It's the bread recipe that's gone viral in the social media lately - the Killer Toast and it claims to produce very soft and irresistible textured bread. Victoria Bakes highly recommended this super uber soft bread and I totally trust Victoria as she has shared quite a number of fantastic bread recipes before. Hop over to her blog for more great recipes.

If you are familiar with breadmaking, you would know the few basic steps - mixing, first rise (or bulk fermentation), shaping, proofing and baking which takes up a long time (at least in my case on cold days).  However this Killer Toast recipe skips one step in the fermentation process. One-time proofing?  Wow, that's music to my ears! You just need to knead, shape, proof and bake!   It means cutting down the number of hours in waiting for the dough to rise twice. 

Yesterday I decided to try out the famous recipe. It was a very cold day whereby the temperature dipped below 18°C indoors. I didn't record the time it took from start to finish, however, by 3pm I could sit down and have a slice of freshly baked bread with my cuppa.  

Liquid mixture:  90g eggs + 70g cream + 200g milk = 360g in total

Knead to get a smooth, silky and elastic dough that doesn't stick to the mixing bowl before incorporating the butter into the dough

To achieve the window-pane test (crucial) - the dough must be stretchy and smooth and translucent 

One-time proofing soft bread (Killer Toast)
A beautiful smooth, soft and silky dough ...

Shaping the dough

... before proofing

after proofing ...

I doubled the original recipe to make 2 loaves ~

Dry mixture:
520g bread flour
60g caster sugar
4g salt
9g instant dried yeast (increased the amount of yeast)

Liquid mixture: Total of 360g
90g eggs
70g thickened cream
200g fresh milk

60g butter, cut into cubes

  • Grease 2 loaf pans (8x4x3 in / 20.5x10.5x7.5 cm). 
  • In a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook, combine all the dry ingredients in a mixing bowl. 
  • Pour in the liquid mixture and knead until the dough is elastic and smooth and leaves the sides of the mixing bowl.  
  • Incorporate the butter into the dough and continue to knead until it passed the window pane test (whereby the dough can be stretched into a paper-thin film without tearing and is translucent).
  • Divide the dough into 6 equal portions (165g each).  Flatten each portion of the dough and roll it up like swiss rolls.  Place 3 rolls in each greased loaf pan .  Cover with cling wrap and let it rise until it reaches 90% of the height of the pan.
  • Bake in a preheated oven of 170°C on the second lowest rack in the oven for about 45 - 50 minutes (tent the top loosely with foil once the bread is sufficiently brown).

14 comments:

  1. totally awesome Veronica! i just dig that "rainy tissue" effect on your loaf.... thanks for the shoutout.. totally appreciate ;P

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    1. Thank you Victoria for sharing the awesome recipe.

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  2. Looks really soft and fluffy. Like the one time proffing method. It is really saving up time compare with ordinary bread making. Thanks for sharing.

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    Replies
    1. Yeah, looks like we have another extra hour or so do do other things while waiting for the bread to proof just the one time.

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  3. Veron thanks for sharing this recipe. I have used yogurt but have not tried using thickened cream. Have KIV this :) my kiv list is getting longer :p

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    Replies
    1. I don't find any difference between using yogurt or cream in bread. Or maybe my palate is not that sensitive.

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  4. The texture looks sooo good! May I know how long it takes to mix the dough to reach window pane stage?

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    Replies
    1. Hi Ellena it took me more than an hour to reach that window pane. But I stopped kneading every 10 to 15 minutes and allow the dough to rest for about 5 to 10 minutes. I find that it helps to develop the structure of the dough. It amazes me to hear some people could reach that window pane stage within 15 minutes of kneading. Not me!

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  5. Beautiful loaf of bread...and it sure looks soft and fluffy...great recipe Veronica.
    Hope you are having a great week :)

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Juliana. Wishing you a beautiful weekend.

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  6. I made this last time but wasn't happy with the shape of the of my loaf :D Love the texture and I prove the dough twice instead of one . Yours look perfectly-baked !

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    Replies
    1. I wonder if there is any difference in texture if proofed the dough twice.

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  7. Yours looks fantastic! My dough just went totally weird so I decided not to continue.. I'm a beginner to making bread, so I thought it might be my kneading or the yeast.

    I also live in Melbourne and am wondering what kind of yeast did you use. I use the Tandaco yeast and did not bloom them first.. Maybe that's why?

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    Replies
    1. Hi my apologies for the late reply. To answer your question I usually use Lowan instant dried yeast. And I've used Tandaco before. Normally I would mix the yeast directly into the dry ingredients. By the way what do you mean your dough went totally weird?

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